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Dining Out
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Ooperlooper


Posts: 104
Joined: Jun 2006
Post: #1
31-05-2008 11:41 PM

I reckon it's wrong that we have to pay VAT on meals when we eat out, but none on most foods bought for cooking at home. The government should scrap VAT on meals out (or equalise VAT on both types of food or something). I suspect this would lead to the more 'continental' lifestyle where people would more routinely go out for food (and drinks), not just drinks binge drinking. I've thought this since coming back from living in Japan, where eating and drinking out is more common than just drinking out, and I think this is at least in part because eating out there is significantly cheaper relative to drinking than it is here.

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brian


Posts: 2,002
Joined: Apr 2005
Post: #2
01-06-2008 05:53 PM

When you see the number of eating establishments ( from up market to chav chicken shops )
it is a wonder there was anyone eating at home.
In the 1950's ( when I was very young in Sydenham ) only Criterion Ice Cream Parlour and Cobbs up market tea rooms.

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Sherwood


Posts: 1,351
Joined: Mar 2005
Post: #3
01-06-2008 09:45 PM

It is also difficult to understand why VAT is payable on biscuits, but not on cakes!

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Bonnie Blue


Posts: 131
Joined: Jan 2009
Post: #4
22-01-2009 08:28 AM

I find most restaurants wanting and rarely use them
My problem is that they salt everything to death
TV Chefs go on and on about seasoning but given that we are best advised to keep our salt intake down, and I do, then I find reataurant food almost unpalatable because I am not used to it

Would rather spend the money on good knives and equipment, good ingredients and cook the food myself

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T and C


Posts: 22
Joined: Mar 2008
Post: #5
22-01-2009 10:37 AM

So what you are saying is that we should knock down all existing restaurants in the area (because they use too much salt), rather than ask the waiter or the chefs to reduce the salt level in the food. Great Idea.. ? (NOT)

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Bonnie Blue


Posts: 131
Joined: Jan 2009
Post: #6
22-01-2009 11:53 AM

Don't be silly

I am saying that none of the restaurants are particularly good but if you want to eat food saturated with salt then go ahead
I am just not bothered about having loads of restaurants in the area I live in I think they are a waste of moeny

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MrGrumpy


Posts: 17
Joined: Oct 2008
Post: #7
22-01-2009 02:28 PM

Haha!

***sits in comfy chair with popcorn (unsalted)***

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Bonnie Blue


Posts: 131
Joined: Jan 2009
Post: #8
22-01-2009 04:13 PM

***snaffles some of Grumpy's popcorn***Sneaky

That's what we need ..........A Popcorn ShopLaugh

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Baboonery


Posts: 581
Joined: Sep 2007
Post: #9
22-01-2009 06:39 PM

I'm not bothered about having schools in the area, I think they're a waste of money. Different people want different things.

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Bonnie Blue


Posts: 131
Joined: Jan 2009
Post: #10
23-01-2009 12:22 PM

I'm not keen on having schools near me but if we didn't educate young people we wouldn't have Doctors and Nurses when we are old and even grumpier
Schools are absolutely necessary but restaurants are not really
Anyway the way things are we will see a big down turn in all business so there will probably be fewer to not like

What astonishes me is the brisk business of the fried chicken shop in Crofton Park when the schools turn out.
Do people not care what their children are eating Those meals are just fat and salt

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SophieBee


Posts: 46
Joined: Oct 2007
Post: #11
23-01-2009 01:03 PM

I'd say that having a number of good quality restaurants in the local area is important for quality of life for a lot of people (and I'd argue that despite what you say about salt, we do have a higher than average range of good quality places to eat in SE23). You may not see the value in them yourself Bonnie, but to suggest they are unneccessary just because you don't eat out is a bit unfair.

What about special occasions, like birthdays or anniversaries? I've had my last two birthdays in local restaurants and had a brilliant time. Whilst I love to cook, I prefer to have someone else do all the hard work on those occasions and would really rather not have to travel into the west end or another part of London to do this. Plus it's great to support local businesses. I really hope that the downturn doesn't force some of our places to close as you suggest, as I think we'll end up regretting having less choice, rather than celebrating having "fewer not to like".

I do take your point about fried chicken places, but it is after all up to individuals where and how they choose to eat, surely?

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Bonnie Blue


Posts: 131
Joined: Jan 2009
Post: #12
23-01-2009 02:13 PM

I just wish people would take responsibility for themselves and their childrenSad

We have a growing obesity problem and the less responsibility people take for themselves the larger our NHS bill is going to be because of the problems associated with that sort food

I spoke to an old lady I know in the GP surgery a few months ago who had high Cholesterol They gave her a choice between reducing it with diet or taking a statin Statins are horrible drugs and so are all drugs for that matter but she chose the statin because it was 'easier'
Every drug you have to take, for any condition really, has side effects and having been prescribed some myself for a congenital heart condition I can tell you those side effects do impinge on your quality of life as I have found to my cost

Why take the risk especially with children?
Why not get into healthier habits and feel good all the time
Quality of life then becomes more than a meal in a restaurant
You can save up and have a ski-ing holiday which is much more funSmile

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Bonnie Blue


Posts: 131
Joined: Jan 2009
Post: #13
23-01-2009 02:17 PM

I do take your point about fried chicken places, but it is after all up to individuals where and how they choose to eat, surely?

Can I just add that as people do as they like the rest of us pay and while I would much prefer someone else having my money's worth out of the NHS, because being ill takes up a lot of life, I still don't like the idea of paying out so someone else can squander that money

We should all take responsibility for ourselves and that includes making a contribution to the world in which we live
If we enjoy having facilities we should at least be prepared to provide some as well

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SophieBee


Posts: 46
Joined: Oct 2007
Post: #14
23-01-2009 03:27 PM

You can save up and have a ski-ing holiday which is much more fun

Well that is definitely a matter of opinion. I went ski-ing once and hated every minute, so given the choice I would much rather have access to some nice restaurants where I can enjoy a relaxing and fun meal with my husband and friends. Why do I have to choose between a holiday and eating out anyway? And why does eating out occasionally have to imply that people aren't taking care of themselves?

Of course it would be preferable to not have such high obesity levels, but I'd have thought tackling this issue is going to be require further investment in education programmes - not closing down restaurants or banning fast food outlets (symptons vs cause and all that).

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shzl400


Posts: 729
Joined: Oct 2007
Post: #15
23-01-2009 03:55 PM

I have a confession. I like Big Macs. I'm not obese (although not a supermodel, either!) and I have one occasionally, as part of a varied diet. And why not? Things that are "bad" for you are only "bad" if eaten all the time. Just because you eat in a restaurant that adds too much salt /chicken shop/doner/whatever just once in a while, it's not going to do you much damage. Moderation in all things!

P.S. Since you brought the subject up, I like skiing too - and have generally found that mountain food (especially in Austria) isn't exactly designed with what we now regard as a "healthy" diet in mind!

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Bonnie Blue


Posts: 131
Joined: Jan 2009
Post: #16
23-01-2009 04:09 PM

Laugh

well not all that hot chocolate and stuff that's for sure

I think all this business about restaurants is going to resolve itself anyway
I saw on the news today that something in the region of 33% of shops (and restaurants) on the high street will close in this recession
When you walk by during the day a lot of them are empty and have very few people in at night

Restaurants don't need occasional they need full houses every night to survive which a lot are not going to do
the newly inspired will not be able to get finanacial backing and many will have their overdrafts withdrawn and goout of business

and to the lady who doesn't like ski-ing
I think you are taKing my remarks a little too literallyRolleyes

So it's all round the the Honor Oak for food and beer and probably big football matches

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SophieBee


Posts: 46
Joined: Oct 2007
Post: #17
23-01-2009 04:31 PM

I'm not clear on what you mean about me taking things too literally? Do you mean about going on a skiing holiday? It was your example so I followed it through. I was just making the point that people have different preferences and opinions as to what constitutes quality of life.

I was, perhaps, being slightly facetious in talking about choosing between a holiday or a meal, but was taking the implication from your post about saving up (presumably from not eating out) and going on holiday.

My name is Sophie by the way - the username does not hide a big mystery!

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Bonnie Blue


Posts: 131
Joined: Jan 2009
Post: #18
23-01-2009 05:13 PM

I didn't have your post in front of me and couldn't remember your name because I was responding to the post after yours
Does it really matter

I would have thought that the ski remark was just an example and not something to be taken up in quite the way you did I could have said
play football, Take salsa lessons, learn to cook,
I could have said a million things but I thought most people would have realised that

sorry to confuse you

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jon14


Posts: 145
Joined: Sep 2007
Post: #19
23-01-2009 05:49 PM

Bonnie Blue, most of your argument is nonsense. People put salt in food because that's what makes it taste nice. If you never put salt in anything then I guarantee that your food won't taste that good to most people, even if it does to you.

Something like a sauce or soup with no salt is like a house without bricks - hardly a house at all.

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Bonnie Blue


Posts: 131
Joined: Jan 2009
Post: #20
23-01-2009 06:17 PM

I disagree Jon
Salt is what people get used to
When you can't have salt you also get used to that and it actually tastes awful when added
I hate salt having not had it for a long time and it spoils the taste of the food but if you like it that's fine
It raises your blood pressure so eventually you will end up taking medication which can be pretty unpleasant as well
It's your choice

It's a bit like not taking sugar in your tea or coffee You get used to it

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