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Japanese Knotweed
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Sherwood


Posts: 1,355
Joined: Mar 2005
Post: #1
11-04-2008 08:38 PM

[Moved from 'SE23 Topics: Leak on corner of Waldram Crescent and Devonshire Road']

Japanese knotweed can come up inside the house!

You need to get rid of it.

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NewForester


Posts: 377
Joined: Feb 2008
Post: #2
12-04-2008 11:11 PM

It's a three year project to get rid of it Sad and it's ugly stuff which can easily travel 7m underground. You have been warned!

The Environment Agency has comprehensive details on how to attack it.

Environment Agency Wrote:
Managing land infested by Japanese knotweed in a timely and appropriate way can avoid:
? excessive cost
? potential prosecution and/or compensation claims
? physical damage to buildings and hard surfaces
? harm to the environment.

The most effective time to apply glyphosate is from July to September (or before cold weather causes leaves to discolour and fall). Spring treatment is acceptable, but less effective. Triclopyr, picloram and 2,4-D amine can be used throughout the growing season. You should avoid the flowering period to protect bees and other pollinating insects. The majority of herbicides are not effective during the winter dormant stage because they require living foliage to take up the active ingredient. An exception to this rule is picloram, which can be applied as a soil treatment.


More information is available on Direct.gov.uk. Good Luck.

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Sherwood


Posts: 1,355
Joined: Mar 2005
Post: #3
13-04-2008 02:39 PM

Can people be forced to get rid of it?

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Snazy


Posts: 1,504
Joined: Jan 2008
Post: #4
13-04-2008 03:07 PM

Just been reading up on it, thats messy stuff.
Would hate to think that it could spread too far and cause further damage.

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Sherwood


Posts: 1,355
Joined: Mar 2005
Post: #5
13-04-2008 08:05 PM

There is a garden near me that is full of Japanese knotweed.
Can the owner be made to clear it?

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BT


Posts: 162
Joined: Jul 2003
Post: #6
14-04-2008 06:19 AM

Its very difficult to eradicate. Its not illegal in the urban environment but illegal to put into the wild.
See here for lots of information
http://www.cabi-bioscience.org/html/japa...liance.htm

Here's a picture of what it looks like
   

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ForestGump


Posts: 202
Joined: Jan 2008
Post: #7
14-04-2008 06:34 AM

When I lived in Sunderland Road next door allowed me to try and kill the Japanese Knotweed in their garden. It had spread 30-40 feet under a hard driveway and was trying to force its way up in the garages.

Oddly, it don't travel the 10-15 feet to the next garden.[/u]

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NewForester


Posts: 377
Joined: Feb 2008
Post: #8
14-04-2008 11:17 AM

Sherwood Wrote:
Can people be forced to get rid of it?

I believe not.

direct.gov.uk Wrote:
Invasive non-native plants are not 'notifiable'. This means that they cannot be dealt with by the Department for the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA) under the Weeds Act.

However, Japanese Knotweed and Giant Hogweed are listed in the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981. This means that it is illegal to plant or cause these plants to grow in the wild in Great Britain. Also the waste from many non-native plants is controlled by law and so certain regulations have to be complied with when disposing of such material.


In other words, if they planted it, you can get something done about it.

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Holly


Posts: 32
Joined: Mar 2008
Post: #9
04-08-2008 11:45 AM

Hi Don't know if any one else has noticed the triffid that is on the corner of Devonshire Road and Waldram Crescent.

A couple of weeks ago I trimmed this triffid so that the poor pedestrians didn't have to risk their lives going in the road to get around the corner. I now have 10 bags of the stuff!

I have looked it up and it looks suspiciously similar to Japanese knotweed. (I have tried to add a picture)

According to the council website this can not be taken due to its invasive nature.

Does anyone know if this is JKW and if so how do i go about getting rid of it?



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shzl400


Posts: 729
Joined: Oct 2007
Post: #10
04-08-2008 12:21 PM

The stuff is a real menace. Cutting it doesn't help. It has to be dug out by hand, making sure to get every scrap or poisoned. I don't know why the council won't take it, as all their stuff goes straight to the SELCHP incinerator - best place for it frankly!

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Holly


Posts: 32
Joined: Mar 2008
Post: #11
04-08-2008 12:30 PM

Thanks shzl400, it gets more depressing the more i read about it. Crying

Beginning to think that our house is cursed. read back on the thread and our house came up again with the leak problem.

If anyone knows of a company who can get rid of it please let me know so that i can get our managing agent to sort it out before it gets in the house.

And hopefully that will smarten the area up a bit as well.

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koza


Posts: 39
Joined: Jun 2008
Post: #12
04-08-2008 12:38 PM

it certainly looks like it and if you mean the site as you walk from devonshire road towards the under pass, it is. i know it well my mum lives across the road from it and it also appears in the front and the back of the house.

it is illegal to produce it and there are certain legal guidelines you have to adhere to if you want to get rid of it, and i think this is still the case. you cannot bin it, it has to be incinerated some how. if you would like it to stop it appearing then that can be very costly. i worked on a park project in north london where we had some knotweed, our budget was 100k and to deal with stuff professionally would have cost 50k, the procedure was to dig a few meters and take it out.

it is pretty much immune to poisons even the industrial stuff. i hope thats helpful and gives you some idea to the nature of the problem with it. it is fine in its native country thats why the victorians brought it over.

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Holly


Posts: 32
Joined: Mar 2008
Post: #13
04-08-2008 12:44 PM

Lets hope that it doesn't come to quite that amount. (It is that house)

I am currently tearing it up where it gets too close to the house and have contacted our managing agent about it several times over the last few months and they don't seem to understand how serious it could be.

I am worried that it will start to take down the wall to our house not just the bordering wall. Who knows how far it has got under the cement!

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koza


Posts: 39
Joined: Jun 2008
Post: #14
04-08-2008 12:59 PM

you may have seen this already looks helpful.

http://property.timesonline.co.uk/tol/li...072777.ece

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NewForester


Posts: 377
Joined: Feb 2008
Post: #15
04-08-2008 01:12 PM

It appears to have spread to the other side of Dartmouth Rd, Devonshire Rd and is even into the rear gardens of St David's Rd. I'd try working with those neighbours if possible.

All waste containing Japanese knotweed comes under the control of Part II of the Environmental Protection Act 1990 and is classified as a controlled substance. If you follow the links I gave, you will be much better informed.

Treating Japanese knotweed early and effectively can significantly reduce the chance of it growing again. You should agree and implement a treatment plan as soon as possible. It is essential that a competent and qualified person carries out the herbicide treatment. Contractors must have the appropriate National Proficiency Tests Council (NPTC) certification. They must carefully follow the instructions on the herbicide label. You can only use certain herbicides in or near water, and you need approval from the Environment Agency before you can use these.
The most effective time to apply glyphosate is from July to September (or before cold weather causes leaves to discolour and fall). Spring treatment is acceptable, but less effective. Triclopyr, picloram and 2,4-D amine can be used throughout the growing season. You should avoid the flowering period to protect bees and other pollinating insects. The majority of herbicides are not effective during the winter dormant stage because they require living foliage to take up the active ingredient. An exception to this rule is picloram, which can be applied as a soil treatment

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Sherwood


Posts: 1,355
Joined: Mar 2005
Post: #16
04-08-2008 01:22 PM

It is definitely japanese knotweed. It is so vigorous it can come up in the house.

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Holly


Posts: 32
Joined: Mar 2008
Post: #17
04-08-2008 01:31 PM

Thank you for all your suggestions.

I think i will definately have to get in touch with those who have also inherited this weed.

If any one knows anyone else in the area, tell them they are welcome to contact me.

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michael


Posts: 3,220
Joined: Mar 2005
Post: #18
04-08-2008 01:57 PM

We have the dreaded knotweed in our garden and around it. The best way to kill it off is to let it grow to a good size so that you can cut the stem and pour glycophosphates directly down it, the branches then die very quickly and it takes a while for more to come back in the same location. To control smaller new growth spray directly on the leaves but it is not effective.

We are still waiting to see how much comes back next year but at least our garden has not be completely overtaken by the weed.

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Holly


Posts: 32
Joined: Mar 2008
Post: #19
04-08-2008 02:08 PM

Thanks Michael, I will try that too, ours is definatly tall enough (It is about double my height)

I wouldn't say it has overtaken our garden, we don't have a garden it is just growing through the concrete. I swear it is trying to get me because i trimmed it.

My Partner has again contacted our managing agent today and added the links that have been given, so hopefully they might also do something. Once that has gone we can concentrate on rebuilding the wall. Yay!

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rich_b


Posts: 1
Joined: Aug 2008
Post: #20
05-08-2008 11:28 AM

We should have an update on this fairly soon. I have been in touch with our managing agent and they will send out a proposal and contractor soon. I have reinforced the importance of getting this matter resolved to prevent and further structural damage to the building and the buildings around it.

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