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Granny spinners
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hillsideresident


Posts: 148
Joined: Jul 2010
Post: #1
30-05-2011 10:15 AM

What do people find is the best strategy for dealing with cyclists who ride on the pavement? I normally just politely tell them they should be on the road. Generally I get no reply, and sometimes I get abuse (which I return with interest).

It seems to me that their strategy is to keep doing it until the authorities give up policing it (which they barely do already) and make it legal. Bad news for pedestrians, and very bad news for the blind, elderly and very young.

Given all the other nonsense from many cyclists (not a minority), I would licence them. This would justify proper fines and proper police activity, and also might deter some idiots from cycling in the first place. Do it properly or use the bus.

Do others have any suggestions?

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andrewr


Posts: 296
Joined: May 2006
Post: #2
30-05-2011 10:34 AM

Is there a particular location where you find cyclists on the pavement to be a problem hillsideresident?

I agree that cyclists on the pavement can be a menace, but I don't see an easy solution other than providing more cycle lanes and recognised shared pavements. There is a clear, and successful, strategy to encourage cycling in London. I see no possibility of a licencing system for many pretty obvious reasons, not the least of which is that it would discourage cycling.

I suspect that cycling on the pavement is pretty low on Police priorities. It's annoying to pedestrians, but does it really cause that many injuries? How does it compare with all the unlicensed drivers on the road who, perhaps, should be a higher priority.

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hillsideresident


Posts: 148
Joined: Jul 2010
Post: #3
30-05-2011 10:52 AM

Andrewr: "Is there a particular location where you find cyclists on the pavement to be a problem hillsideresident?"
The pavements where there are pedestrians.

"I agree that cyclists on the pavement can be a menace, but I don't see an easy solution other than providing more cycle lanes and recognised shared pavements."
How about cyclists using the road? They're not forced onto the pavement. It's a choice they make because they are selfish or timid.

"There is a clear, and successful, strategy to encourage cycling in London."
I'm all for encouraging proper cyclists, but they are becoming a minority.

"I see no possibility of a licencing system for many pretty obvious reasons, not the least of which is that it would discourage cycling."
I think we should discourage idiot cyclists. What other "obvious" reasons do you have? Seems pretty straighforward to me.

"I suspect that cycling on the pavement is pretty low on Police priorities."
You think?

"It's annoying to pedestrians, but does it really cause that many injuries?"
Why do we have to be injured? Would it be OK if I climb over your garden fence and use your back garden? Would you be injured? That's all right, then.

"How does it compare with all the unlicensed drivers on the road who, perhaps, should be a higher priority?"
Knife crime is more important than shoplifting. Shall we legalise shoplifting, then?

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seeformiles


Posts: 269
Joined: Apr 2005
Post: #4
30-05-2011 12:51 PM

Cycling on the pavements can definitely be menacing and dangerous to pedestrians. I've been sworn at for stopping and turning suddenly and not hearing a cyclist riding close behind me - my daring to be a pedestrian on the pavement forced the cyclist to brake. I suppose I'm lucky they did, or they would have crashed into me.

Face the facts; there is a real problem.
Most modern bikes are silent, you can't hear them behind you and why should I have to share the pavements with them? If they're not prepared to cycle on the road then they shouldn't have a bike in the first place.

I get really annoyed when I see pedestrian's legitimate concerns being belittled. And just because the police can't or won't deal with it effectively doesn't mean it isn't a danger. Try walking through Hyde Park and watch how many ignore the 'no cycling' signs. There are clearly marked cycle paths but they still ignore them and choose pedestrian only paths instead.

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brian


Posts: 2,002
Joined: Apr 2005
Post: #5
30-05-2011 02:45 PM

I agree. Say they cause an accident as they are not insured no claim.

Trouble is most of the offenders are young and fit whilst the persons offended against are not.

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robin orton


Posts: 716
Joined: Feb 2009
Post: #6
30-05-2011 04:32 PM

Why is this thread called 'granny spinners' please?

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shzl400


Posts: 729
Joined: Oct 2007
Post: #7
30-05-2011 06:11 PM

One of the main problems is that the person most often to be found cycling on the pavement is the one that has no respect for anyone in the first place. It's just another way they have of demonstrasting blatant disrespect to authority. They are probably known to the police already and cycling on the pavement is likely to be the least of their offences (as opposed to it being the least of the police's priorities).

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hillsideresident


Posts: 148
Joined: Jul 2010
Post: #8
30-05-2011 06:34 PM

I thought "granny spinners" because they leave old ladies spinning like tops in their wake.

Actually it has a cycling meaning, which is to describe someone who is creeping slowly up a hill using their lowest gear (the "granny" gear), but I figure they've intruded on our territory, so why not steal their term?

But I expect someone will some up with something much better as time goes on.

What shocks me is how I would be ashamed to ride on the pavement to avoid the traffic, but they just don't feel that shame at all.

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roz


Posts: 1,790
Joined: Mar 2005
Post: #9
30-05-2011 07:47 PM

Despite our road being very steep, we still get a lot of cyclists going up on the pavement, today being a case in point where we nearly walked into one when leaving our house. They put their head down and push so they can still do a good speed when going uphill. They also go downhill on the pavement which is of course, a lot faster. It is extremely scary when you have young children and now have to watch out for them on the pavement as well as on the roads. Ive also had them come up behind me when I've been pushing a buggy also with a young child walking alongside.

Nothing for me beats the scene about three years ago now when someone cycled down the steps at Forest Hill station from the bridge. He could have killed someone waiting on the platform especially if he'd knocked someone onto the path of an approaching train. Fortunately those of us who were on the platform anticipated what was coming and got out of the way. I still see this guy regularly cycling along Honor Oak Road.

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Jane_D


Posts: 189
Joined: Jan 2010
Post: #10
30-05-2011 10:17 PM

I got knocked over on the pavement a couple of years by a young cyclist shooting down a steep hill and round a blind corner straight into me. It hurt! I wouldn't mind cyclists on the pavement too much if they were careful and observed pedestrian speeds, but some of them aren't and don't.

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andrewr


Posts: 296
Joined: May 2006
Post: #11
30-05-2011 10:32 PM

Lots of great comments about why everyone hates cyclists on the pavement, but no real suggestions as to what can be done about them. In my previous post, I wasn't trying to suggest that I approved of cycling on the pavement, I don't - although I'm not sure 3 year olds should be forced to cycle on the road. My query as to whether there was a place where it was a particular problem was aimed at arranging for some action to be taken at that location - perhaps by the Safer Neighbourhood Team. It's much easier to get the Police to deal with specific problems[/i] than general ones.

As suggested, those who cycle on the pavement are probably mostly those with a blatant disregard for authority. Perhaps pedestrians should carry walking sticks to push through spokes? Nothing like a bit of direct action!

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IWereAbsolutelyFuming


Posts: 531
Joined: Oct 2007
Post: #12
30-05-2011 11:04 PM

Quote:
Why is this thread called 'granny spinners' please?


Surely it would be better called "Some People Do Bad Things"?

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Jane_D


Posts: 189
Joined: Jan 2010
Post: #13
30-05-2011 11:14 PM

The spoke-stick is an interesting suggestion, but might require a certain dexterity on the part of the user that could be equally well be used in leaping out of the way.

Maybe a pithy television campaign would do the trick, like the ones that aim to get people to observe speed limits. I think part of the problem is failure of imagination on the part of some cyclists. Eg, they feel at a disadvantage on the road because the rest of the traffic is heavier and faster than them, but don't notice that if they ride fast on the pavement they are putting pedestrians at a similar disadvange.

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Jane_D


Posts: 189
Joined: Jan 2010
Post: #14
30-05-2011 11:16 PM

Coming back to the original point, proper cycle lanes would obviously give a great incentive to stay off the pavements. But I guess the argument against them is that there's too much other traffic to be accomodated...

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seeformiles


Posts: 269
Joined: Apr 2005
Post: #15
30-05-2011 11:21 PM

AndrewR, obviously wasn't talking about 3 year olds.
I took it for granted others realised that.

Don't quite get why if something bad is happening, we should be expected to produce a solution to the problem. I'm not a town planner, traffic expert or in the police. Was hoping by now the specialists might come up with an answer.

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michael


Posts: 3,199
Joined: Mar 2005
Post: #16
31-05-2011 08:26 AM

I would encourage more pedestrians to do the same as I do. Smile politely at cyclists who are waiting at traffic lights or who allow you to cross a zebra crossing - there are still a few decent cyclists around. But for those cycling on the pavement or jumping red lights I deliberately block their path, forcing them to stop so that I can point to the area designated by specialists for them to cycle - the road. I have been called various rude names, and one gentleman pointed out that he did have his daughter travelling on a seat behind him, so couldn't possibly be expected to cycle on the road.

If more pedestrians stopped cyclists to remind them that they should be on the road, then cyclists would soon find it quicker and easier to cycle on the road.

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Bt


Posts: 160
Joined: Jul 2003
Post: #17
31-05-2011 09:02 AM

A friend of ours was knocked down and suffered a broken ankle when hit by a cyclist on a canal path while walking her dog. Cyclist ended up in the water Thumbsup

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brian


Posts: 2,002
Joined: Apr 2005
Post: #18
31-05-2011 09:08 AM

Good the cyclist ended up in the water but probably better than a broken ankle.
I suppose you could take out a private prosecution if you had their full details.

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AMFM


Posts: 306
Joined: Oct 2007
Post: #19
31-05-2011 11:21 AM

Cyclists are allowed on the canal path. The cyclist in question may well have been cycling irresponsibly but that doesn't mean he or she shouldn't have been there.

As for pavement cyclists, as many others have already pointed out, the cyclists who take to the pavement at speed will undoubtedly be the ones who will drive irresponsibly when they get their licences (the culprits are almost overwhelmingly teenage boys). I can assure you though, no sensible cyclists wants a collision with anyone, pedestrain or otherwise as it hurts us too!

And as Michael said, it is unfair to tar all cyclists with the same brush. I obey the rules of the road, I cycle on the road and don't run red lights, and yes, I let pedestrians cross at zebra crossings (because that is what I am supposed to do).

As more and more people take to their bikes in London, experienced cyclists have a responsibility to set a good example to new road users by obeying traffic laws - from my perspective, Boris bike users in Central london are the worst offenders and I'm astonished that we haven't seen an increase in casualties as a result (but maybe the statistics aren't in yet)

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Poppy9560


Posts: 273
Joined: Aug 2008
Post: #20
31-05-2011 11:42 AM

cycle lanes don't seem to help with this problem - there is one over the bridge in Catford - it is usually completely ignored by fully grown "men" who use the (very narrow) pavement to cycle on. I would like the police to spend a week issuing on the spot fines to cyclist who use the pavement - and if they don't pay up a week in prison.

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