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Time Out: Honor Oak Park
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nevermodern


Posts: 653
Joined: Feb 2007
Post: #1
30-01-2008 09:29 PM

Article in this week's 'Homes' section in Time Out:

"With talk of a new bakery and the East London Line on its way, could Timothy Spall's old manor be on the up?"

Can't find a link online, unfortunately. Sad

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michael


Posts: 3,215
Joined: Mar 2005
Post: #2
31-01-2008 12:38 AM

Extracts from the article:

Consume - Homes - Streets of London - Honor Oak Park, SE23;
With talk of a new bakery and the East London Line on its way, could Timothy Spall's old manor be on the up? Jessica Cargill-Thompson scales the Hornimans to find out.

Like its neighbours Nunhead and Forest Hill, Honor Oak is often talked of locally as 'up and coming'. Its Mediterranean deli displays adverts for a gazebo maker, private drum tuition and a local art and crafts open day. Meanwhile, contributors to online discussion forum se23.com (any area with aspirations must have one) talk excitedly about the opening of a new bread shop, where to find the best doctor's practice, and the local Italian restaurant making it into Hardens.
....

A transitional mix of shops, cafes and restaurants line the main road: a toys and gifts shop, mid-century furniture dealer, Italian restaurant as well as a Cypriot travel agent and strip of unreconstructed fried food outlets. Across the junction around Brockley Rise is another burst of activity with a Caribbean health food shop, genteel secondhand shop, and an upmarket Indian restaurant (Babur Brasserie, 119 Stondon Park; 020 8291 4881). Keeping things grounded is The Chandos, a big traditional pub showing Sky Sports.

The woods of One Tree Hill dominate the area, one of the highest - and steepest - points of south London with dramatic views across the city in one direction and out to Kent in the other. Clinging to the slopes down from Honor Oak Road are rambling Victorian and Edwardian villas in varying states of repair, 1930s semis, low-rise blocks of flats, and Walter Segal's pioneering 1970s and 1980s timber frame self-build project. Most streets are architecturally mixed and some require crampons; those to the west (behind the Horniman Museum) have been dubbed 'The Hornimans' by estate agents to denote desirability. In contrast, downhill on the eastern side of the railway line, neat rows of Victorian, Edwardian and inter-war terraces characterise the flat low ground off Brockley Rise and Stondon Park.

The area has long been undervalued, though residents of south-west London, as well as Canary Wharf and Highbury, are starting to cotton on, encouraged by the promise of the East London Line extension in 2010 and big commercial and retail development in nearby Lewisham. Desirable streets include Devonshire Road, a long leafy road with plenty of flats, and the quieter streets around Bovill and Garthorne Roads.

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Ghis


Posts: 321
Joined: Jan 2007
Post: #3
31-01-2008 10:25 AM

Nice.

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hopper


Posts: 65
Joined: Jan 2008
Post: #4
31-01-2008 07:29 PM

This is the full article:

Time Out - 30/01/2008
Jessica Cargill-Thompson

Like its neighbours Nunhead and Forest Hill, Honor Oak is often talked of locally as 'up and coming'. Its Mediterranean deli displays adverts for a gazebo maker, private drum tuition and a local art and crafts open day. Meanwhile, contributors to online discussion forum se23.com (any area with aspirations must have one) talk excitedly about the opening of a new bread shop, where to find the best doctor's practice, and the local Italian restaurant making it into Hardens.

Honor Oak is an oft-forgotten enclave, not without charm, on the bus route between Peckham and Lewisham. If you don't live in south London and aren't a follower of lone famous local Timothy Spall, you may never even have heard of it.

A transitional mix of shops, cafes and restaurants line the main road: a toys and gifts shop, mid-century furniture dealer, Italian restaurant as well as a Cypriot travel agent and strip of unreconstructed fried food outlets. Across the junction around Brockley Rise is another burst of activity with a Caribbean health food shop, genteel secondhand shop, and an upmarket Indian restaurant (Babur Brasserie, 119 Stondon Park; 020 8291 4881). Keeping things grounded is The Chandos, a big traditional pub showing Sky Sports.

The woods of One Tree Hill dominate the area, one of the highest - and steepest - points of south London with dramatic views across the city in one direction and out to Kent in the other. Clinging to the slopes down from Honor Oak Road are rambling Victorian and Edwardian villas in varying states of repair, 1930s semis, low-rise blocks of flats, and Walter Segal's pioneering 1970s and 1980s timber frame self-build project. Most streets are architecturally mixed and some require crampons; those to the west (behind the Horniman Museum) have been dubbed 'The Hornimans' by estate agents to denote desirability. In contrast, downhill on the eastern side of the railway line, neat rows of Victorian, Edwardian and inter-war terraces characterise the flat low ground off Brockley Rise and Stondon Park.

The area has long been undervalued, though residents of south-west London, as well as Canary Wharf and Highbury, are starting to cotton on, encouraged by the promise of the East London Line extension in 2010 and big commercial and retail development in nearby Lewisham. Desirable streets include Devonshire Road, a long leafy road with plenty of flats, and the quieter streets around Bovill and Garthorne Roads.

Going out

There's a reason why this area attracts so many young families. Apart from 4am DJ bar Equal (barequal.com) and a handful of decent restaurants, there's b****r-all nightlife. Locally, Forest Hill, Peckham, and East Dulwich are livelier bets.

Local shops

This is still an area in transition but approaching a critical mass of gift and food shops: Jumping Bean (45 Honor Oak Park; 020 8314 4747) is probably best. Look out too for mid-century furniture dealer ID (No 49; 020 8699 8087) and Bertram Bakery, about to open at No 5. There's also Caribbean health-food shop Yam Hill (108 Brockley Rise; 0208 8314 1154).

Schools

Fairlawn (fairlawn.lewisham.sch.uk) is a popular primary school, for those who don't mind hills, but secondary school provision is still an issue. Independent St Dunstans (stdunstans.org.uk) on the South Circular and community Specialist Science girls' school Sydenham School (sydenham.lewisham.sch.uk) both have solid reputations.

Transport

Frequent trains direct to Victoria and London Bridge, and a good selection of bus routes: P4 to Brixton and Lewisham; P12 to Surrey Quays; 171 to Holborn; 172 to St Paul's. Promise of the East London Line extension by 2010.

Local estate agents

Haart (020 8291 4563; haart.co.uk).

Sebastian Roche (020 8291 9441; sebastianroche.com).

Willmotts (willmotts.com).

CAN YOU AFFORD IT?

?399,995

Three-bed 1930s house, Courtrai Rd.

?269,950

Two-bed Victorian conversion flat, Devonshire Road.

?178 pw

One-bed first-floor flat, Boveney Road.

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nevermodern


Posts: 653
Joined: Feb 2007
Post: #5
31-01-2008 10:15 PM

Now I feel lazy Sad Smile

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lillam


Posts: 129
Joined: Apr 2006
Post: #6
31-01-2008 11:29 PM

michael Wrote:
Consume - Homes - Streets of London - Honor Oak Park, SE23;
With talk of a new bakery and the East London Line on its way, could Timothy Spall's old manor be on the up? Jessica Cargill-Thompson scales the Hornimans to find out.

Like its neighbours Nunhead and Forest Hill, Honor Oak is often talked of locally as 'up and coming'.

Its Mediterranean deli displays adverts for a gazebo maker, private drum tuition and a local art and crafts open day.

Meanwhile, contributors to online discussion forum se23.com (any area with aspirations must have one) talk excitedly about the opening of a new bread shop, where to find the best doctor's practice, and the local Italian restaurant making it into Hardens.

Thumbdown
I wish people like Jessica Cargill-Thompson would get a real job - if articles like this mean people like her move here it will be time to get out fast.

Above all I resent the idea that some trend-spotting, property-price increasing hack views a community forum as some kind of badge of aspiration -as if SE23.com is some yuppie-talkshop.Cursing

...Im starting to dread this tube extension - do we really want Canary Wharf drones mainlined into our neigbourhood? I think we might be better off without them. (being able to get a tube up to crystal palace will be good though)

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baggydave


Posts: 384
Joined: May 2004
Post: #7
31-01-2008 11:58 PM

Odd that I spoke to a Time Out journo a year ago about the wonders of SE23, and all they printed was a load of nonsense that we were all hippies and pagans. A much better attempt this time round, but please don't run down our secondary school, have enough problems with the middle classes doing that in the area already (see a longstanding separate thread).

Oh, and goodie, someone also doesn't want a link to Hoxton and Canary Wharf.

Just reread some of this and there is some pretentious nonsense in it! And what's the nonsense about lack of night life.

BD - working class hero

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