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Railway pictures
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ukulele_lady


Posts: 25
Joined: May 2010
Post: #21
03-02-2011 09:08 AM

Thank you Zimmerman Smile I'm really enjoying your posts about the history of the area, it's great to know more about your surroundings. These pics are fab

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Zimmerman


Posts: 81
Joined: Jan 2011
Post: #22
03-02-2011 07:30 PM

The Electric Train comes into Honour Oak Station, the platform still had the original wooden boards that had wide spaces between them, not very safe for those wearing high heel shoes.



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Zimmerman


Posts: 81
Joined: Jan 2011
Post: #23
03-02-2011 11:00 PM

Steam Train leaves Lordship Lane Station heading to Cox's Walk Bridge.



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squashst


Posts: 129
Joined: Mar 2009
Post: #24
04-02-2011 12:22 AM

Superb posts Zimmerman and nice pictures.
To think that in 70 years time there will be pics of the Overground in this area.

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Perryman


Posts: 809
Joined: Dec 2006
Post: #25
04-02-2011 09:39 AM

Quote:
Steam Train leaves Lordship Lane Station heading to Cox's Walk Bridge.


I've not seen that picture before.
With the Dulwich Woods tunnel in the background, I'd agree the train is heading to Cox's Walk, but Lordship Lane Station is behind the artist.

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Zimmerman


Posts: 81
Joined: Jan 2011
Post: #26
04-02-2011 11:42 AM

Well spotted Perryman.
Did you spot my other error?
In the Honour Oak Station Message I said the Electric Train is coming into Honour Oak Station but as there is no third rail the electric one, it can only be a Steam train leaving in that direction.
I was looking at several pictures I have and put the wrong one in, but as I am unable to Edit my posts I could not change it.
Pleased you spotted that, we want the facts correct.

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michael


Posts: 3,199
Joined: Mar 2005
Post: #27
04-02-2011 11:44 AM

Quote:
the Electric Train is coming into Honour Oak Station but as there is no third rail the electric one, it can only be a Steam train leaving in that direction.

It doesn't look like steam, could it be diesel?

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andrewr


Posts: 296
Joined: May 2006
Post: #28
04-02-2011 06:13 PM

Since this seems to be a forum for getting the facts right, I think it was always called Honor Oak Station (without a 'u') as in the current name of the area. Having said which, the 1870 OS map calls it Honour Oak Station - but it has changed to Honor Oak by the 1894 edition!

We are almost certainly looking at the back of the train as it is leaving Honor Oak Station - trains nearly always run on the left in the UK. That being the case it is very difficult to see whether it is a steam train.

Wikipedia (here) says that this line was electrified in 1925 so the picture must be older than that. That being the case it seems probable that the train in the picture was steam hauled. I can't find any evidence that diesel engines were ever used on suburban railways pre-electrification. The Southern railway was initially electrified using overhead ac power. Perhaps we would have less problems in bad weather if it still was!

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roz


Posts: 1,790
Joined: Mar 2005
Post: #29
04-02-2011 10:33 PM

Are we sure its Honor Oak station in this photo? The current station is pretty sunken yet this station seems to be at ground level or just above. Are we sure its not Forest Hill?

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Zimmerman


Posts: 81
Joined: Jan 2011
Post: #30
04-02-2011 11:43 PM

Roz.
Honor Oak Station ceased to exist over fifty years ago and is now covered in Tower blocks of flats. It was in Wood Vale.
I think that you are thinking of a different railway system that does include a station called Honor Oak Park.

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Zimmerman


Posts: 81
Joined: Jan 2011
Post: #31
04-02-2011 11:54 PM

Roz.     I think you are thinking of ths station Att.

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squashst


Posts: 129
Joined: Mar 2009
Post: #32
05-02-2011 08:50 AM

That is a historical photo - it shows a panopoly of trees behind the platform, platform 1 exists in a complete state, and access to platforms was by proper steps not balsa wood additions.

The same photo today would look quite different!

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roz


Posts: 1,790
Joined: Mar 2005
Post: #33
05-02-2011 09:44 AM

Silly me. I wasn't paying attention.

Good photos though. Are these part of your personal collection?

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Zimmerman


Posts: 81
Joined: Jan 2011
Post: #34
06-02-2011 04:36 PM

Picture Post Cards.

I do have a substantial collection of post cards, it can be a rewarding hobby, but can involve a costly sum to purchase the cards.
I belonged to a club, most clubs collect both the cards and the stamps.
What can you find out about a card?
The subject of the picture be it a train it might be a Steam engine with a wheel formation of 0 4 0 this means it has no wheels in front or behind the four driving wheels, it might have a number of carriages how many and what livery are the painted in?
The post card would have been made in the early days in the local Stationery shop in the close vicinity in a back room, most were taken as a photograph, the negative was used each time to be place over a plain card then exposed to the light placing a copy of that photograph, these were just black on white, some even came out as sepia an orange colour, this had to be fixed that meant submerging in a solution and hanging out to dry. The reverse side would have printed on it the name of the manufacturer address a possible number of how many printed in this format, a dividing line for the address to be written and a space for the message an outline of the position of where the postage stamp should be glued.
It is possible to see what time and date it was posted, sometimes there were three posts a day, so a morning collection would be received later that same day. See: Where it was posted. The address that it was sent to, and the recipient.
The stamp that was on it shows the King ruling then.
In the early days all writing by the sender was by steel nib pen dipped in an ink bottle, as space was very limited the wording was simple, just saying from a person on holiday, Dad had a dip in the sea today .
These cards for collecting have been sold over again and again, it is interesting to see the lightly pencilled price on the back, from a few pence to many pounds, I had to stop buying them when they cost over 1 each.
I used to keep these in albums but when you have over a hundred it takes up too much space so I have now put each one in its own plastic sleeve, you can read each side without removing it. It is a problem of what category to put them, Area, Date, Coloured or Black on white. I use empty Christmas Card Boxes I can store about fifty in each.
Many pictures were painted over to pick out green as a tree or a red engine, I have several identical painted over and they do differ in the area covered.
If you have been a member of a Post Card Club then you become friends with other collectors who you know have a collection of a set that you are interested in they will show you them on their site and they will allow you to snag them.
Should you decide to join a club a monthly meeting, it seldom lasts more than a hour and a half, then a member will display a set of his post cards and perhaps give a little talk on them, there is always dealers there with thousands of post cards for sale. It only costs a fiver a year to be a member this covers the cost of the news letters and invitations from other clubs you are invited to go to.

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