SE23.com - The Official Forum for Forest Hill & Honor Oak, London SE23
Online since 2002  -  10,000+ members

Home | SE23 Topics | Local Businesses | Wider Topics | Offered/Wanted/Lost/Found | Advertising | Contact
Geddes Hairdressing & Barbering Studio One Armstrong & Co Solicitors


Post Reply  Post Topic 
AED (defibrillator) at FH station
Author Message
michael


Posts: 3,200
Joined: Mar 2005
Post: #1
07-04-2016 08:35 AM

Somebody pointed out that we should probably make this more widely known.

In case of suspected heart attack there is a defibrillator at the station (see photo), on platform 1, next to the ticket office. It is easy to use and will not shock anybody unless they are having a heart attack.



There is also a defibrillator at the swimming pool.

If you have a smartphone I would recommend downloading the St Johns Ambulance App
which includes instructions for manual CPR (including voice directions while you are in the process)

But first thing to do in case of a suspected heart attack is call the ambulance.



Attached File(s) Thumbnail(s)
   
Find all posts by this user Reply
Mr_Numbers


Posts: 510
Joined: May 2012
Post: #2
07-04-2016 10:01 AM

I've seen these around occasionally. You say they're easy to use - I'd always assumed they were there for medical personnel to use, before a paramedic team can arrive. No?

Find all posts by this user Reply
michael


Posts: 3,200
Joined: Mar 2005
Post: #3
07-04-2016 10:08 AM

Anybody can use them.

Quote:
You can use an AED with no training. The machine analyses someone’s heart rhythm and then uses visual or voice prompts to guide you through each step.

• First, make sure someone has called for an ambulance, and, if an AED isn’t immediately available, give CPR (cardiopulmonary resuscitation) until someone can bring you an AED.

• As soon as you’ve got an AED, switch it on. It will immediately start to give you a series of visual and verbal prompts informing you of what you need to do. Follow these prompts until the ambulance arrives or someone with more experience than you takes over.

More details at http://www.sja.org.uk/sja/first-aid-advi...r-aed.aspx

Find all posts by this user Reply
Mr_Numbers


Posts: 510
Joined: May 2012
Post: #4
07-04-2016 10:16 AM

Wow. I never knew that. Yes, your original post was right. This does need to be made more widely known. Thanks for doing so, Michael.

Find all posts by this user Reply
Tinkerbell


Posts: 356
Joined: Dec 2007
Post: #5
07-04-2016 10:58 AM

Thanks Michael, very useful info!

Find all posts by this user Reply
Londondrz


Posts: 1,538
Joined: Apr 2006
Post: #6
08-04-2016 01:36 PM

I downloaded that St.Johns app. Very very good. I know how fix bullet wounds but not how to do a lot else. Laugh

Find all posts by this user Reply
Applespider


Posts: 283
Joined: Feb 2006
Post: #7
08-04-2016 07:46 PM

Thanks for letting us know.

I'd had a similar assumption about AEDs being difficult to use until I went on a first aid course for the first time in a decade or so. They are amazing - it will quite literally talk you through what you need to do, check that the pads are positioned correctly and tell you when to stand clear if a shock is required. They can also help prompt you to do CPR giving you the rhythm to use and letting you know whether your pressure is effective.

At our first aid course, they asked someone who had never used one before to try it on the dummy without any instruction from the trainer. We were all surprised at how easy they were to use.

Find all posts by this user Reply

Friends of Blythe Hill Fields