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Cockney Rhyming Slang - genuine only

Author Message
Ana
Joined 30-01-2007
Posted on Monday, 02 July, 2007 - 01:11 pm:   

Can we start a glossary of GENUINE cockney rhyming slang please, for those times the forum dulls down to issues on newspaper deliveries etc..
One entry per post and an example would be good. I'll start with my favourite and let's see how genuine and numerous we can make it... And maybe we should all try to incorporate more of this colourful language in our posts as an added weapon against dull posts.
Ana
Joined 30-01-2007
Posted on Monday, 02 July, 2007 - 01:12 pm:   

Scooby - as in Haven't got a Scooby - Scooby Doo - Clue
Bigjulie
Joined 09-04-2005
Posted on Monday, 02 July, 2007 - 09:45 pm:   

Screaming Alice for Crystal Palace
Johnc
Joined 09-01-2007
Posted on Tuesday, 03 July, 2007 - 07:08 am:   

I think I can be of assistance here, having lived for the majprity of my life in the now defunct borough of Bermondsey. I grew up with rhyming slang and still use it when in the company of my peers. Everyone knows that it originated to confuse people, often the police, but what is less well understood is that to be used authentically you should only use the first word. So to take my first example saying "I just spent 100 on a new whistle" gives a completely wrong impression of what is being conveyed. Also it does evolve from generation to generation taking advantage of modern icons - hence Scooby Do. Below is a selection of those I have, and still use (some references date back to the early part of the last century since I first heard them from my grandfather.

Whistle and Flute - suit
Almond rocks - socks
Daisy roots - boots
Dickie Dirt - shirt
Tit for Tat - hat
Peckham Rye - tie
Sky rockets - pockets
Round the houses - trousers
Mince pies - eyes
I suppose - nose
North and south - mouth
German bands - hands
Plates of meat - feet
Barnet fair - hair
Gregory Peck - neck
Heap of coke - bloke
Lilian Gish - fish
Jockeys whips - chips
Sexton Blake - steak
Jack Holt - salt
Rocking horse - sauce

I could go on, but you get the idea
Ana
Joined 30-01-2007
Posted on Tuesday, 03 July, 2007 - 10:00 am:   

Please go on John - my next contribution:

Let's get a sherbert - sherbert dab - cab
Haylands
Joined 29-09-2006
Posted on Tuesday, 03 July, 2007 - 10:24 am:   

David Mellor - pint of Stella
Leo Sayer - all dayer (as in drinking from noon)
Courtney Cox - box (as in caught me in courntey's when playing cricket)
Johnc
Joined 09-01-2007
Posted on Tuesday, 03 July, 2007 - 11:46 am:   

Boat race - face
Rub a Dub - pub - a personal favourite
Board and chalk - walk
Frog and toad - road
Ginger beers - ears (originally)
Loaf of bread - head
Vear Lynn - gin
Skin and blister - sister
Trouble and strife - wife

And one that should be but isnt
Nice and clean - washing machine
Triangle
Joined 08-05-2007
Posted on Tuesday, 03 July, 2007 - 12:33 pm:   

Mustn't forget...

Dog and bone - phone & Jam jar - car
Sherwood
Joined 30-03-2005
Posted on Tuesday, 03 July, 2007 - 01:41 pm:   

Ruby Murray - curry
Rosie Lee - tea
apples and pears - stairs
Triangle
Joined 08-05-2007
Posted on Wednesday, 04 July, 2007 - 09:54 am:   

Johnc, Sherwood has just reminded me... I used to frequent a pub off the Old Kent Road (near to Verney Road SE16) called the "Apples and Pears" on a Sunday evening, (rock night!) ...long since gone. I recall that the entrance was at the top of some stairs. Just wondered if you knew it and whether you could confirm that it was called the "Apples and Pears" through rhyming slang?
Sherwood
Joined 30-03-2005
Posted on Wednesday, 04 July, 2007 - 09:56 am:   

Is this correct?:
Peter's cafe - safe.
Andy
Joined 23-02-2005
Posted on Wednesday, 04 July, 2007 - 10:09 am:   

Lady (Godiva) Fiver
Ayrton (Senna) Tenner
15 - A Commodore (3 times a lady)
Johnc
Joined 09-01-2007
Posted on Wednesday, 04 July, 2007 - 10:50 am:   

Triangle, I tended to frequent the Bricklayers Arms end of the OKR, but it does ring a few bells. Was it a "Millwall" pub.
Sherwood
Joined 30-03-2005
Posted on Wednesday, 04 July, 2007 - 11:16 am:   

Butcher's hook - look.
Triangle
Joined 08-05-2007
Posted on Wednesday, 04 July, 2007 - 11:34 am:   

Judging by the long haired rockers on a Sunday night it wasn't! But wasn't far away from the ground and was right in the middle of residential area, so could well have been during the week. Went to quite a few of the pubs in and around the OKR late 70's early 80's, but then it seemed they all started changing names and management! However, I recall hearing rhyming slang being used in most of them - and of course in the markets.
Hilltopgeneral
Joined 24-03-2004
Posted on Wednesday, 04 July, 2007 - 03:14 pm:   

Sherwood's suggestion sounds like threepennies...
Sherwood
Joined 30-03-2005
Posted on Wednesday, 04 July, 2007 - 03:23 pm:   

Hilltopgeneral:


From a google search:
"Butcher's Hook is Cockney Rhyming Slang for Look
Cockney rhyming slang. Rhyming cockney slang ... Butcher's Hook. Butcher's Hook is slang for Look. More slang for Look ...
www.cockneyrhymingslang.co.uk/slang/butcher_s_hook - 19k - Cached - Similar pages"
Hilltopgeneral
Joined 24-03-2004
Posted on Wednesday, 04 July, 2007 - 04:15 pm:   

I was referring to the rather non-rhyming 'cafe' and 'safe'.
Sherwood
Joined 30-03-2005
Posted on Wednesday, 04 July, 2007 - 09:16 pm:   

I was asking the expert on that one. I have heard police in the Sweeney talking about a peter-man as if he is a safe-cracker. If that is correct cafe will be pronounced cafe to rhyme with safe.
Sherwood
Joined 30-03-2005
Posted on Wednesday, 04 July, 2007 - 09:21 pm:   

Here's another one that does not rhyme either.
Tommy Trinder - window.
Don't blame me. Blame the people who made them up.
Sherwood
Joined 30-03-2005
Posted on Wednesday, 04 July, 2007 - 09:39 pm:   

Duke of Kent - rent
Porkie pies - lies
Ana
Joined 30-01-2007
Posted on Wednesday, 04 July, 2007 - 10:27 pm:   

Tommy Trinder rhymes with Winder as in Sarf London Speak 'in it?
Johnc
Joined 09-01-2007
Posted on Thursday, 05 July, 2007 - 06:59 am:   

Potato's (tayters) in the mould - cold
George Raft - draught


And sadly, to bring the tone of the thred down a notch or two, a few relating to bodily functions

Pony and Trap
Ertha Kitt
Jimmy Riddle
Beau Nash
Pvp
Joined 17-03-2005
Posted on Thursday, 05 July, 2007 - 08:16 am:   

My fav, Barnet fair - hair.
Bigjulie
Joined 09-04-2005
Posted on Thursday, 05 July, 2007 - 11:49 am:   

He's walking funny because of his Chalfonts...
Johnc
Joined 09-01-2007
Posted on Thursday, 05 July, 2007 - 11:56 am:   

A topical one considering todays obituary

George Melly - belly
Sherwood
Joined 30-03-2005
Posted on Thursday, 05 July, 2007 - 12:10 pm:   

Aristotle - bottle
Sherwood
Joined 30-03-2005
Posted on Thursday, 05 July, 2007 - 12:15 pm:   

Bread and honey - money
Brown bread - dead
Bigjulie
Joined 09-04-2005
Posted on Thursday, 05 July, 2007 - 12:37 pm:   

Harry Lime - time
Harry Nash - cash
Harry Dash - flash (lairy)
Harry Monk - can't remember that one...
Haylands
Joined 29-09-2006
Posted on Thursday, 05 July, 2007 - 02:09 pm:   

funk
Pvp
Joined 17-03-2005
Posted on Thursday, 05 July, 2007 - 04:36 pm:   

Slap dash - cash
Baggydave
Joined 19-05-2004
Posted on Thursday, 05 July, 2007 - 05:20 pm:   

Don't be such a Berk.
And can you blow a raspberry

(Both genuine, but wont translate).

Also do it in Glasgow I believe
Baggydave
Joined 19-05-2004
Posted on Thursday, 05 July, 2007 - 06:44 pm:   

Another one is 'Souness'; this could be applied to Toffee Jim
Toffeejim
Joined 27-11-2004
Posted on Saturday, 07 July, 2007 - 08:47 am:   

Thanks Baggy, aren't you a merry old soul!
Baggydave
Joined 19-05-2004
Posted on Saturday, 07 July, 2007 - 04:13 pm:   

I thought you were 'brown bread', nice to hear from you even if you are a bit of a clever 'three card trick'
Ooperlooper
Joined 28-06-2006
Posted on Saturday, 07 July, 2007 - 11:36 pm:   

When are mens' tits coming back into fashion then? A man's not proper dressed without a nice tit, if you ask me, gov'nor.